A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research

STEM

Subscribe to RSS - STEM

The acronym for the study of science technology, engineering and mathematics, identified as essential in education.

From Nashville to New Hampshire, PPPL’s student interns do research, attend classes and socialize from their home computers

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s internship programs have gone virtual with 47 interns from all over the U.S. working on projects remotely and hundreds tuning in to a virtual introductory course in plasma physics and fusion energy.

Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem

A challenge to creating fusion energy on Earth is trapping the charged gas known as plasma that fuels fusion reactions within a strong magnetic field and keeping the plasma as hot and dense as possible for as long as possible. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have gained new insight into a common type of hiccup known as the sawtooth instability that cools the hot plasma in the center and interferes with the fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality.

Mathematical noodling leads to new insights into an old fusion problem

A challenge to creating fusion energy on Earth is trapping the charged gas known as plasma that fuels fusion reactions within a strong magnetic field and keeping the plasma as hot and dense as possible for as long as possible. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have gained new insight into a common type of hiccup known as the sawtooth instability that cools the hot plasma in the center and interferes with the fusion reactions. These findings could help bring fusion energy closer to reality.

Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices

One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the sun and stars is trapping hot, charged plasma gas within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller. But the device, called a stellarator, must be precisely engineered to prevent heat from escaping the plasma core where it stokes the fusion reactions. Now, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have demonstrated that an advanced computer code could help design stellarators that confine the essential heat more effectively.

Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices

One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the sun and stars is trapping hot, charged plasma gas within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller. But the device, called a stellarator, must be precisely engineered to prevent heat from escaping the plasma core where it stokes the fusion reactions. Now, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have demonstrated that an advanced computer code could help design stellarators that confine the essential heat more effectively.

Fun science for parents and kids at PPPL’s virtual Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work (at home) Day

More than 100 PPPL parents and children attended the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work (at Home) Day on April 23 to watch plasma experiments and find out about science experiments they can do at home. (The experiments are listed below).

The virtual event was led by Science Education senior program leaders Shannon Swilley Greco and Arturo Dominguez, with the help of Swilley Greco’s three children, Annika, 2, Ryan, 5, and Lukas, 7, and some enthusiastic virtual participants.

Wake up with cutting-edge science on Saturday mornings at PPPL’s Science on Saturday lecture series

Science enthusiasts will get a jolt of excitement along with their coffee at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture series, which debuts Jan. 11. 

The first talk in the series will be “Visual Perception and the Art of the Brain,” by Sabine Kastner, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton University. 

Pages

U.S. Department of Energy
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

Website suggestions and feedback

Pinterest · Instagram · LinkedIn · Tumblr.

PPPL is ISO-14001 certified

Princeton University Institutional Compliance Program

Privacy Policy · Sign In (for staff)

© 2020 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. All rights reserved.

Princeton University
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
P.O. Box 451
Princeton, NJ 08543-0451
GPS: 100 Stellarator Road
Princeton, NJ, 08540
(609) 243-2000