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The study of plasma, a partially-ionized gas that is electrically conductive and able to be confined within a magnetic field, and how it releases energy.

Internationally renowned physicist Joel Hosea remembered for a 50-year career that encompassed much of PPPL’s history

The story of Joel Hosea’s career is the story of PPPL. The Laboratory, founded as Project Matterhorn in 1951, had only been called the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for seven years when Hosea began work there in 1968. He worked at many of the Laboratory’s major experiments and devoted his 50-year career to research at PPPL and around the world. 

Hosea died on Aug. 25, just a day after beginning treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. He was 79. 

Internationally renowned physicist Joel Hosea remembered for a 50-year career that encompassed much of PPPL’s history

The story of Joel Hosea’s career is the story of PPPL. The Laboratory, founded as Project Matterhorn in 1951, had only been called the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for seven years when Hosea began work there in 1968. He worked at many of the Laboratory’s major experiments and devoted his 50-year career to research at PPPL and around the world.

Hosea died on Aug. 25, just a day after beginning treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. He was 79.

Discovered: Optimal magnetic fields for suppressing instabilities in tokamaks

Fusion, the power that drives the sun and stars, produces massive amounts of energy. Scientists here on Earth seek to replicate this process, which merges light elements in the form of hot, charged plasma composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei, to create a virtually inexhaustible supply of power to generate electricity in what may be called a “star in a jar.”

New graduate student summer school launches at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Graduate physics students from across the country recently descended on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for the first PPPL Graduate Summer School — a series of lectures the week of Aug. 13 on topics in the field of plasma physics and an opportunity to meet other students with similar research interests. “The objective was to bring graduate students from all over the country to the Lab so we could share some of what goes on here with them,” said Arturo Dominguez, PPPL’s science education senior program leader who led the event.

New graduate student summer school launches at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Graduate physics students from across the country recently descended on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for the first PPPL Graduate Summer School — a series of lectures the week of Aug. 13 on topics in the field of plasma physics and an opportunity to meet other students with similar research interests. “The objective was to bring graduate students from all over the country to the Lab so we could share some of what goes on here with them,” said Arturo Dominguez, PPPL’s science education senior program leader who led the event.

Artificial intelligence project to help bring the power of the sun to Earth is picked for first U.S. exascale system

To capture and control the process of fusion that powers the sun and stars in facilities on Earth called tokamaks, scientists must confront disruptions that can halt the reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped devices.  Now an artificial intelligence system under development at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University to predict and tame such disruptions has been selected as an Aurora Early Science project by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Artificial intelligence project to help bring the power of the sun to Earth is picked for first U.S. exascale system

To capture and control the process of fusion that powers the sun and stars in facilities on Earth called tokamaks, scientists must confront disruptions that can halt the reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped devices.  Now an artificial intelligence system under development at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University to predict and tame such disruptions has been selected as an Aurora Early Science project by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Undergraduate students extoll benefits of national laboratory research internships in fusion and plasma science

They gathered in the lobby of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in dresses and suits, standing in front of posters showing computer-aided-design (CAD) drawings, mathematical equations, and line graphs, preparing to explain a summer of plasma physics research.

Undergraduate students extoll benefits of national laboratory research internships in fusion and plasma science

They gathered in the lobby of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in dresses and suits, standing in front of posters showing computer-aided-design (CAD) drawings, mathematical equations, and line graphs, preparing to explain a summer of plasma physics research.

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