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Plasma diagnostics

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The tools used by researchers to assess the characteristics of superheated and electrically charged gases known as plasmas.

PPPL physicists to create new X-ray diagnostics for the WEST fusion device in France

A team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won a DOE Office of Science award to develop new X-ray diagnostics for WEST — the Tungsten (W) Environment in Steady-state Tokamak — in Cadarache, France. The three-year, $1-million award will support construction of two new devices at PPPL, plus collaboration with French scientists and deployment of a post-doctoral researcher to test the installed devices at CAE Laboratories, the home of the WEST facility. 

Two PPPL physicists, David Johnson and Charles Skinner, named ITER Scientist Fellows

David Johnson and Charles Skinner, principal research physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have been appointed to three-year terms as ITER Scientist Fellows. They will join a network of internationally recognized researchers who will consult with ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in France, on plans and components for the project, which is designed to demonstrate the practicality of fusion energy.

PPPL takes detailed look at 2-D structure of turbulence in tokamaks

A key hurdle for fusion researchers is understanding turbulence, the ripples and eddies that can cause the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions to leak heat and particles and keep fusion from taking place. Comprehending and reducing turbulence will facilitate the development of fusion as a safe, clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity from power plants around the world.

Steven Sabbagh leads study to predict and avoid disruptions on KSTAR plasmas

Steven Sabbagh, a senior research scientist at Columbia University on long-term assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named lead principal investigator for a multi-institutional project on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. The three-year, $3.3 million collaboration will study methods of predicting and avoiding disruptions on KSTAR, a long-pulse tokamak that produces plasmas that can last from 30 seconds to a design value of more than five minutes.

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