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Nuclear energy

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Energy that originates from the splitting of uranium atoms in a process called fission. This is distinct from a process called fusion where energy is released when atomic nuclei combine or fuse.

Physicist Dan Boyer wins Early Career Award for research in Artificial Intelligence methods to advance fusion energy

Dan Boyer, a physicist and developer of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning methods to produce real-time adjustments to the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in evices known as spherical tokamaks, has won a highly competitive and prestigious U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award.

Physicist Dan Boyer wins Early Career Award for research in Artificial Intelligence methods to advance fusion energy

Dan Boyer, a physicist and developer of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning methods to produce real-time adjustments to the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in devices known as spherical tokamaks, has won a highly competitive and prestigious U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award.

Fooling fusion fuel: How to discipline unruly plasma

The process designed to harvest on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars can sometimes be tricked. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics laboratory have derived and demonstrated a bit of slight-of-hand called “quasi-symmetry” that could accelerate the development of fusion energy as a safe, clean and virtually limitless source of power for generating electricity. 

Fooling fusion fuel: How to discipline unruly plasma

The process designed to harvest on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars can sometimes be tricked. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics laboratory have derived and demonstrated a bit of slight-of-hand called “quasi-symmetry” that could accelerate the development of fusion energy as a safe, clean and virtually limitless source of power for generating electricity. 

Scientists collaborate on public-private partnership to facilitate the development of commercial fusion energy

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is collaborating with private industry on cutting-edge fusion research aimed at achieving commercial fusion energy. This work, enabled through a public-private DOE grant program, supports efforts to develop high-performance fusion grade plasmas.

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