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The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), which underwent a $94 million upgrade, is being repaired. It will be the most powerful experimental fusion facility, or tokamak, of its type in the world when it is back in operation. Experiments will test the ability of the upgraded spherical facility to maintain a high-performance plasma under conditions of extreme heat and power. Results could strongly influence the design of future fusion reactors.

Fusion physicist Roscoe White steps down after a long and fruitful career at PPPL

After 47 years as a path-setting theoretical physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Roscoe White retired on June 1, 2021, only one might never know it. A former head of the PPPL Theory Department and now a senior researcher in retirement, “I can continue to submit papers and publish and use my computer account to do research,” White said. “That’s all I need.”

Physicist Dan Boyer wins Early Career Award for research in Artificial Intelligence methods to advance fusion energy

Dan Boyer, a physicist and developer of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning methods to produce real-time adjustments to the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in evices known as spherical tokamaks, has won a highly competitive and prestigious U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award.

Physicist Dan Boyer wins Early Career Award for research in Artificial Intelligence methods to advance fusion energy

Dan Boyer, a physicist and developer of innovative artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning methods to produce real-time adjustments to the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in devices known as spherical tokamaks, has won a highly competitive and prestigious U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award.

New machine learning theory that can be applied to fusion energy raises questions about the very nature of science

A novel computer algorithm, or set of rules, that accurately predicts the orbits of planets in the solar system could be adapted to better predict and control the behavior of the plasma that fuels fusion facilities designed to harvest on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

Researchers find unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions

Electric current is everywhere, from powering homes to controlling the plasma that fuels fusion reactions to possibly giving rise to vast cosmic magnetic fields. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before.

Batten down the hatches: Preventing heat leaks to help create a star on Earth

Creating a star on Earth requires a delicate balance between pumping enormous amounts of energy into plasma to make it hot enough for fusion to occur and preventing that heat from escaping. Now, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have identified a method by which instabilities can be tamed and heat can be prevented from leaking from the plasma, giving scientists a better grasp on how to optimize conditions for fusion in devices known as tokamaks.

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