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This function manages the design, fabrication and operation of PPPL experimental devices, and oversees the Laboratory’s facilities and its electrical and infrastructure systems.

Alex Nagy, a “creative and energetic” engineer, is named a Distinguished Engineering Fellow

Alex Nagy, an engineer who for four decades has been working on ways to heat and fuel plasmas in experiments aimed at harnessing the process that powers the sun and stars, was named a Distinguished Engineering Fellow by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at the State of the Lab address on Dec. 20. 

Nagy was honored for “creative designs of plasma heating and fueling systems employed in fusion devices worldwide.” The fellowship is part of PPPL’s Distinguished Research and Engineering Fellow Program and comes with a cash award.

Batten down the hatches: Preventing heat leaks to help create a star on Earth

Creating a star on Earth requires a delicate balance between pumping enormous amounts of energy into plasma to make it hot enough for fusion to occur and preventing that heat from escaping. Now, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have identified a method by which instabilities can be tamed and heat can be prevented from leaking from the plasma, giving scientists a better grasp on how to optimize conditions for fusion in devices known as tokamaks.

Early-career engineers learn about the wide variety of tasks in PPPL program

Nick Santoro is a military veteran who graduated from college in 2018 and was working as an engineer, but was looking for a job that would allow him to use more of the skills he learned in college. 

Bill Harris recently received his master’s degree in engineering after graduating from a five-year program and was looking for a job that would allow him to do hands-on work designing and building components. 

Early-career engineers learn about the wide variety of tasks in PPPL program

Nick Santoro is a military veteran who graduated from college in 2018 and was working as an engineer, but was looking for a job that would allow him to use more of the skills he learned in college. 

Bill Harris recently received his master’s degree in engineering after graduating from a five-year program and was looking for a job that would allow him to do hands-on work designing and building components. 

PPPL receives recognition for apprenticeship program

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) received the 2019 Business Partner of the Year award from the Mercer County Technical Schools for its new apprenticeship program, which provides paid on-the-job training and free technical courses to train early-career technicians in cutting edge skills. 

Mercer County Technical Schools gave the award to PPPL’ers who helped establish the program at an Oct. 30 event at the school.

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