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This function manages the design, fabrication and operation of PPPL experimental devices, and oversees the Laboratory’s facilities and its electrical and infrastructure systems.

PPPL receives recognition for apprenticeship program

The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) received the 2019 Business Partner of the Year award from the Mercer County Technical Schools for its new apprenticeship program, which provides paid on-the-job training and free technical courses to train early-career technicians in cutting edge skills. 

Mercer County Technical Schools gave the award to PPPL’ers who helped establish the program at an Oct. 30 event at the school.

Public-private INFUSE projects to speed fusion development housed at PPPL

State-of-the-art computer codes and world-class expertise at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will provide four of the first 12 collaborations under the newly created Innovation Network for Fusion Energy (INFUSE) program. The public-private partnerships, funded by the DOE Office of Science, are intended to speed the development on Earth of the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

Public-private INFUSE projects to speed fusion development housed at PPPL

State-of-the-art computer codes and world-class expertise at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will provide four of the first 12 collaborations under the newly created Innovation Network for Fusion Energy (INFUSE) program. The public-private partnerships, funded by the DOE Office of Science, are intended to speed the development on Earth of the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

Bob Ellis: New chief engineer has designed components for fusion experiments around the world

It is possible that no one at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  (PPPL) has deeper roots here than Bob Ellis. The son of a well-known physicist, Ellis has spent almost four decades designing and overseeing construction of components of some of the world’s biggest fusion experiments, from PPPL’s Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U),  to the Joint European Torus in England and the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) fusion reactor in South Korea. 

Look, up in the sky! Interns develop a device that levitates droplets of water

Among the many projects that interns worked on this summer at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is an acoustical levitator that causes droplets of water to levitate in mid-air so their interaction with plasma can be examined. Assembled by Remy Plattiers, now a freshman at the University of New Haven, the device suspends droplets with sound waves whose high frequency is hard to hear.

Really fun

New national facility will explore low-temperature plasma, a dynamic source of innovation for modern technologies

Low-temperature plasma, a rapidly expanding source of innovation in fields ranging from electronics to health care to space exploration, is a highly complex state of matter.  So complex that the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with Princeton University to become home to a collaborative facility open to researchers from across the country to advance the understanding and control of this dynamic physical state.

Extensive resources

New national facility will explore low-temperature plasma, a dynamic source of innovation for modern technologies

Low-temperature plasma, a rapidly expanding source of innovation in fields ranging from electronics to health care to space exploration, is a highly complex state of matter.  So complex that the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with Princeton University to become home to a collaborative facility open to researchers from across the country to advance the understanding and control of this dynamic physical state.

Extensive resources

New technique could streamline design of intricate fusion device

Stellarators, twisty machines that house fusion reactions, rely on complex magnetic coils that are challenging to design and build. Now, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has developed a mathematical technique to help simplify the design of the coils, making stellarators a potentially more cost-effective facility for producing fusion energy.

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