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The PPPL function that reaches out to students, teachers and the general public through programs ranging from student internships to weekly talks on scientific topics from January through April.

Wake up with cutting-edge science on Saturday mornings at PPPL’s Science on Saturday lecture series

Science enthusiasts will get a jolt of excitement along with their coffee at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture series, which debuts Jan. 11. 

The first talk in the series will be “Visual Perception and the Art of the Brain,” by Sabine Kastner, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton University. 

Wake up with cutting-edge science at PPPL’s Science on Saturday lecture series

Science enthusiasts will get a jolt of excitement along with their coffee at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture series, which debuts Jan. 11. 

The first talk in the series will be “Visual Perception and the Art of the Brain,” by Sabine Kastner, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton University. 

Early-career engineers learn about the wide variety of tasks in PPPL program

Nick Santoro is a military veteran who graduated from college in 2018 and was working as an engineer, but was looking for a job that would allow him to use more of the skills he learned in college. 

Bill Harris recently received his master’s degree in engineering after graduating from a five-year program and was looking for a job that would allow him to do hands-on work designing and building components. 

Early-career engineers learn about the wide variety of tasks in PPPL program

Nick Santoro is a military veteran who graduated from college in 2018 and was working as an engineer, but was looking for a job that would allow him to use more of the skills he learned in college. 

Bill Harris recently received his master’s degree in engineering after graduating from a five-year program and was looking for a job that would allow him to do hands-on work designing and building components. 

Barbara Garcia: A first-generation college student spends summer doing research at PPPL

As a first-generation college student, Barbara Garcia had to figure out a lot of things on her own when applying for college. Her parents were Mexican immigrants who didn’t go to college and couldn’t help her navigate the application process, couldn’t help her study for the SATs or look over her application essays. 

“Being a first-generation college student has influenced me by teaching me independence and helping me to carve my own path,” Garcia said. “I didn’t have my parents to guide me toward STEM – I just sort of found it on my own and discovered physics on my own.” 

Barbara Garcia: A first-generation college student spends summer doing research at PPPL

As a first-generation college student, Barbara Garcia had to figure out a lot of things on her own when applying for college. Her parents were Mexican immigrants who didn’t go to college and couldn’t help her navigate the application process, couldn’t help her study for the SATs or look over her application essays. 

“Being a first-generation college student has influenced me by teaching me independence and helping me to carve my own path,” Garcia said. “I didn’t have my parents to guide me toward STEM – I just sort of found it on my own and discovered physics on my own.” 

Promise Adebayo-Ige: Pursuing a lifelong interest in fusion energy

When friends asked Promise Adebayo-Ige what he was doing over the summer, he told them he was trying to save the world by working at a national laboratory devoted to developing fusion energy.

Adebayo-Ige has been fascinated with the idea of fusion as an inexhaustible, inexpensive, and clean source of generating electric energy since he was a teenager. Now a rising senior majoring in chemical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, he plans to attend graduate school in nuclear engineering with the goal of working on the quest for fusion energy 

Promise Adebayo-Ige: Pursuing a lifelong interest in fusion energy

When friends asked Promise Adebayo-Ige what he was doing over the summer, he told them he was trying to save the world by working at a national laboratory devoted to developing fusion energy.

Adebayo-Ige has been fascinated with the idea of fusion as an inexhaustible, inexpensive, and clean source of generating electric energy since he was a teenager. Now a rising senior majoring in chemical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, he plans to attend graduate school in nuclear engineering with the goal of working on the quest for fusion energy. 

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