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Artificial Intelligence

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In short, there is a global demand for clean, cheap, reliable energy – and artificial intelligence (AI) is increasingly being used to help meet this need. 

Artificial intelligence helps prevent disruptions in fusion devices

An international team of scientists led by a graduate student at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has demonstrated the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the same computing concept that will empower self-driving cars, to predict and avoid disruptions — the sudden release of energy stored in the plasma that fuels fusion reactions  — that can halt the reactions and severely damage fusion facilities.

Risk of disruptions

New twist in artificial intelligence could enhance the prediction of fusion disruptions

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to create an innovative technique to improve the prediction of disruptions in fusion energy devices — a grand challenge in the effort to capture on Earth the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars.

New twist in artificial intelligence could enhance the prediction of fusion disruptions

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have used Artificial Intelligence (AI) to create an innovative technique to improve the prediction of disruptions in fusion energy devices — a grand challenge in the effort to capture on Earth the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars.

Former PPPL intern honored for outstanding machine learning poster

The American Physical Society (APS) has recognized a summer intern at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for producing an outstanding research poster at the world-wide APS Division of Plasma Physics (DPP) gathering last October. The student, Marco Miller, a senior at Columbia University majoring in applied physics, used machine learning to accelerate a leading PPPL computer code known as XGC as a participant in the DOE’s Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program in 2019.

Artificial intelligence — an exciting new way to speed development of fusion energy

How can scientists foresee and avoid massive disruptions in plasma, a key hurdle to bringing the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars to Earth to generate electricity? “You can’t have a prototype reactor if it’s disrupting,” says William Tang, a physicist at PPPL and a Princeton University professor who leads a project to forecast disruptions through artificial intelligence (AI) — the branch of computer science that is transforming scientific inquiry and industry.  

Machine learning speeds modeling of experiments aimed at capturing fusion energy on Earth

Machine learning (ML), a form of artificial intelligence that recognizes faces, understands language and navigates self-driving cars, can help bring to Earth the clean fusion energy that lights the sun and stars. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are using ML to create a model for rapid control of plasma — the state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei, or ions — that fuels fusion reactions.

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