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Tokamaks

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A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container.

Ronald Davidson, former director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, pioneering physicist, author, and professor passes away

Ronald C. Davidson, a pioneering plasma physicist for 50 years who directed the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) during a crucial period of its history and was a founding director of the Plasma Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), passed away on May 19 at his home in Cranbury, New Jersey, due to complications from pneumonia. He was 74.

Ronald Davidson, former director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, pioneering physicist, author, and professor passes away

Ronald C. Davidson, a pioneering plasma physicist for 50 years who directed the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) during a crucial period of its history and was a founding director of the Plasma Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), passed away on May 19 at his home in Cranbury, New Jersey, due to complications from pneumonia. He was 74.

Energy Secretary Moniz Launches the Nation’s Newest Fusion Experiment at PPPL

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz dedicated the most powerful spherical torus fusion facility in the world on Friday, May 20, 2016. The $94-million upgrade to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX-U), funded by the DOE Office of Science, is a spherical tokamak fusion device that explores the creation of high-performance plasmas at 100-million degree temperatures many times hotter than the core of the sun.

Energy Secretary Moniz Launches the Nation’s Newest Fusion Experiment at PPPL

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz dedicated the most powerful spherical torus fusion facility in the world on Friday, May 20, 2016. The $94-million upgrade to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX-U), funded by the DOE Office of Science, is a spherical tokamak fusion device that explores the creation of high-performance plasmas at 100-million degree temperatures many times hotter than the core of the sun.

A major upgrade of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at PPPL will explore liquid lithium as a first wall for hot plasmas

A promising experiment that encloses hot, magnetically confined plasma in a full wall of liquid lithium is undergoing a $2 million upgrade at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Engineers are installing a powerful neutral beam injector in the laboratory’s Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX), an innovative device used to test the liquid metal as a first wall that enhances plasma performance. The first wall material faces the plasma.

Scientists challenge conventional wisdom to improve predictions of the bootstrap current at the edge of fusion plasmas

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have challenged understanding of a key element in fusion plasmas. At issue has been an accurate prediction of the size of the “bootstrap current” — a self-generating electric current — and an understanding of what carries the current at the edge of plasmas in doughnut-shaped facilities called tokamaks.

Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that helps stabilize fusion plasmas

Imène Goumiri, a Princeton University graduate student, has worked with physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to simulate a method for limiting instabilities that reduce the performance of fusion plasmas. The more instabilities there are, the less efficiently doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called tokamaks operate. The journal Nuclear Fusion published results of this research in February 2016.

Princeton graduate student Imène Goumiri creates computer program that helps stabilize fusion plasmas

Imène Goumiri, a Princeton University graduate student, has worked with physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to simulate a method for limiting instabilities that reduce the performance of fusion plasmas. The more instabilities there are, the less efficiently doughnut-shaped fusion facilities called tokamaks operate. The journal Nuclear Fusion published results of this research in February 2016.

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