A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research

Tokamaks

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A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container.

David A Gates

David Gates is a principal research physicist for the advanced projects division of PPPL, and the stellarator physics leader at the Laboratory. In the latter capacity he leads collaborative efforts with the Wendelstein 7-X and Large Helical Device stellarator projects in Germany and Japan, respectively.

Kelsey Tresemer

Kelsey Tresemer has been the primary design engineer and cost account manager for plasma-facing components for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and currently serves as cost account manager for the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). Apart from this work, she has been employed in the research of refractory first wall materials for experimental fusion facilities, and has participated in the retrofitting and repair of several neutral beam system components.

Stefan Gerhardt

Stefan Gerhardt leads the Advanced Scenarios and Control research group in the NSTX organization. He operates numerous diagnostics on NSTX, along with designing plasma control schemes and running physics experiments. He has previously worked on a wide variety of fusion machines, including spherical tokamaks, stellarators, and field reversed configurations.

Michael C Zarnstorff

Michael Zarnstorff is the deputy director of research for PPPL where he supervises research that ranges from testing ideas for harnessing fusion to developing rockets for space flight. His job encompasses keeping projects aligned with DOE goals and envisioning new research opportunities for PPPL. An award-winning physicist and a co-discoverer of the bootstrap current, he joined PPPL in 1984 and has been deputy director for research since 2009. He earned his PhD in plasma physics from the University of Wisconsin.

New Jersey firm creates jobs and vital components for world-leading experiment

One of the largest scientific projects since the moon landing has Oxford Superconducting Technology in Carteret, New Jersey, humming around the clock. The company is producing nearly 10,000 miles of superconducting wire for ITER, a huge international venture being built in the south of France to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity.

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