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Tokamaks

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A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container.

PPPL honors physicists Steven Sabbagh and Gregory Hammett

PPPL presented its 2013 outstanding research awards to physicists Steven Sabbagh and Gregory Hammett following Director Stewart Prager’s May 28 State-of-the-Laboratory Address. Sabbagh received the Kaul Foundation Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research and Technology Development for his work on advancing the understanding, and enhancing the stability, of high-performance plasmas in fusion facilities called tokamaks. Hammett was named winner of the Distinguished Research Fellow Award for his work on deepening the theoretical understanding of turbulence in fusion plasmas.

PPPL honors physicists Steven Sabbagh and Gregory Hammett

PPPL presented its 2013 outstanding research awards to physicists Steven Sabbagh and Gregory Hammett following Director Stewart Prager’s May 28 State-of-the-Laboratory Address. Sabbagh received the Kaul Foundation Prize for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research and Technology Development for his work on advancing the understanding, and enhancing the stability, of high-performance plasmas in fusion facilities called tokamaks. Hammett was named winner of the Distinguished Research Fellow Award for his work on deepening the theoretical understanding of turbulence in fusion plasmas.

Phil Heitzenroeder named winner of the 2013 Fusion Technology Award

Phil Heitzenroeder, who leads the Mechanical Engineering Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and whose advice is sought by engineers around the world, has won the 2013 Fusion Technology Award.  The high honor from the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recognizes outstanding contributions to research and development in the field of fusion technology.

PPPL partners with China in an ambitious new center for fusion research

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has joined with five leading Chinese research institutions to form an international center to advance the development of fusion energy. Creators of the center organized its framework in March at a two-day session in Hefei, China, that brought together leaders of the world’s major fusion programs.

Rich Hawryluk recalls “exciting and challenging” years working on ITER

What is it like to be at the center of ITER, the huge international fusion experiment that is under construction in Cadarache, France? “It’s both exciting and challenging,” said physicist Rich Hawryluk, who recently returned to PPPL after a two-year stint as deputy director-general for the Administration Department of ITER. “It’s exciting in the scope and scale of this effort, and challenging in bringing such a large project to completion.”

PPPL Open House

Mark your calendar and prepare to have some fun at The Princeton Plasma Physics Lab's Open House on June 1 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. when the Laboratory will open its doors for the public to see the National Spherical Torus Experiment and other research experiments. Come take a self-guided tour, take part in hands-on activities, watch demonstrations. Plans also include a moon rocks display from NASA, lectures on fusion by PPPL Director Stewart Prager, a cryogenics show, firefighting demonstrations and numerous other activities as well as refreshments and give-aways.

Rajesh Maingi adds a new strategic dimension to fusion and plasma physics research

Physicist Rajesh Maingi remembers nearly everything. Results of experiments he did 20 years ago play back instantly in his mind, as do his credit card and bank account numbers.

His knack for recalling research results comes in particularly handy. “Knowing results from five-to-20 years ago makes it easier to ask the right questions for contemporary scientific programs,” Maingi said. Such findings have made him a leading expert on key aspects of the physics of plasma, the superhot, charged gas that fuels fusion reactions in donut-shaped magnetic facilities called tokamaks.

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