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Tokamaks

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A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container.

Robert Goldston receives 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award at IAEA conference for best paper published in 2012

Fusion researcher Robert Goldston, a Princeton University professor of astrophysical sciences and former director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), received the 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award for the most outstanding paper to appear in the journal Nuclear Fusion during 2012. Presenting the award was Yukiya Amano, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), during the IAEA’s 2016 Nuclear Fusion Energy Conference in Kyoto, Japan.

Robert Goldston receives 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award at IAEA conference for best paper published in 2012

Fusion researcher Robert Goldston, a Princeton University professor of astrophysical sciences and former director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), received the 2015 Nuclear Fusion Award for the most outstanding paper to appear in the journal Nuclear Fusion during 2012. Presenting the award was Yukiya Amano, director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), during the IAEA’s 2016 Nuclear Fusion Energy Conference in Kyoto, Japan.

PPPL physicists win funding to lead a DOE exascale computing project

A proposal from scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has been chosen as part of a national initiative to develop the next generation of supercomputers. Known as the Exascale Computing Project (ECP), the initiative will include a focus on exascale-related software, applications, and workforce training.

First results of NSTX-U research operations presented at the International Atomic Energy Agency Conference in Kyoto, Japan

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratories (PPPL) and collaborating institutions presented results from research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) last week at the 26th International Atomic Energy Agency Conference (IAEA) in Kyoto, Japan. The four-year upgrade doubled the magnetic field strength, plasma current and heating power capability of the predecessor facility and made the NSTX-U the most powerful fusion facility of its kind.

Steven Sabbagh leads study to predict and avoid disruptions on KSTAR plasmas

Steven Sabbagh, a senior research scientist at Columbia University on long-term assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named lead principal investigator for a multi-institutional project on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. The three-year, $3.3 million collaboration will study methods of predicting and avoiding disruptions on KSTAR, a long-pulse tokamak that produces plasmas that can last from 30 seconds to a design value of more than five minutes.

Steven Sabbagh leads study to predict and avoid disruptions on KSTAR plasmas

Steven Sabbagh, a senior research scientist at Columbia University on long-term assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named lead principal investigator for a multi-institutional project on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. The three-year, $3.3 million collaboration will study methods of predicting and avoiding disruptions on KSTAR, a long-pulse tokamak that produces plasmas that can last from 30 seconds to a design value of more than five minutes.

PPPL researchers successfully test new device that analyzes the surfaces of tokamak components within a vacuum

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have successfully tested a new device that will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between ultrahot plasma contained within fusion facilities and the materials inside those facilities. The measurement tool, known as the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), was built by a consortium that includes Princeton University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (U. of I.). 

PPPL researchers successfully test new device that analyzes the surfaces of tokamak components within a vacuum

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have successfully tested a new device that will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between ultrahot plasma contained within fusion facilities and the materials inside those facilities. The measurement tool, known as the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), was built by a consortium that includes Princeton University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (U. of I.).

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