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Tokamaks

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A nuclear fusion reactor in which a magnetic field keeps charged, hot plasma moving in a doughnut-shaped vacuum container.

Physicists Steven Sabbagh and Jack Berkery receive 2016 Landau-Spitzer Award

Steven Sabbagh and Jack Berkery, Columbia University physicists on assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have received the 2016 Landau-Spitzer Award for outstanding contributions to plasma physics. Also sharing in the award are Holger Reimerdes of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland and Yueqiang Liu of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in the United Kingdom. The award is named for Russian physicist Lev Landau, a 1962 Nobel laureate, and Princeton astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, founder of PPPL.

Physicists Steven Sabbagh and Jack Berkery receive Landau-Spitzer Award

Steven Sabbagh and Jack Berkery, Columbia University physicists on assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have received the 2016 Landau-Spitzer Award for outstanding contributions to plasma physics. Also sharing in the award are Holger Reimerdes of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland and Yueqiang Liu of the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in the United Kingdom. The award is named for Russian physicist Lev Landau, a 1962 Nobel laureate, and Princeton astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, founder of PPPL.

Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi conducts computer simulations that indicate the efficiency of an innovative fusion start-up technique

Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University has for the first time performed computer simulations indicating the efficiency of a start-up technique for doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. The simulations show that the technique, known as coaxial helicity injection (CHI), could also benefit tokamaks that use superconducting magnets. The research was published in March 2016, in Nuclear Fusion, and was supported by the DOE's Office of Science. 

Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi conducts computer simulations that indicate the efficiency of an innovative fusion start-up technique

Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Princeton University has for the first time performed computer simulations indicating the efficiency of a start-up technique for doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. The simulations show that the technique, known as coaxial helicity injection (CHI), could also benefit tokamaks that use superconducting magnets. The research was published in March 2016, in Nuclear Fusion, and was supported by the DOE's Office of Science. 

Physicist Egemen Kolemen awarded funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program

Physicist Egemen Kolemen, who has dual appointments at both Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been awarded funding from the DOE's Early Career Research Program. The grant, covering five years and totaling almost $850,000, will support research on how to monitor and control instabilities within fusion machines known as tokamaks.

Physicist Egemen Kolemen awarded funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program

Physicist Egemen Kolemen, who has dual appointments at both Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been awarded funding from the DOE's Early Career Research Program. The grant, covering five years and totaling almost $850,000, will support research on how to monitor and control instabilities within fusion machines known as tokamaks.

Ronald Davidson, former director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, pioneering physicist, author, and professor passes away

Ronald C. Davidson, a pioneering plasma physicist for 50 years who directed the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) during a crucial period of its history and was a founding director of the Plasma Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), passed away on May 19 at his home in Cranbury, New Jersey, due to complications from pneumonia. He was 74.

Ronald Davidson, former director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, pioneering physicist, author, and professor passes away

Ronald C. Davidson, a pioneering plasma physicist for 50 years who directed the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) during a crucial period of its history and was a founding director of the Plasma Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), passed away on May 19 at his home in Cranbury, New Jersey, due to complications from pneumonia. He was 74.

Energy Secretary Moniz Launches the Nation’s Newest Fusion Experiment at PPPL

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz dedicated the most powerful spherical torus fusion facility in the world on Friday, May 20, 2016. The $94-million upgrade to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX-U), funded by the DOE Office of Science, is a spherical tokamak fusion device that explores the creation of high-performance plasmas at 100-million degree temperatures many times hotter than the core of the sun.

Energy Secretary Moniz Launches the Nation’s Newest Fusion Experiment at PPPL

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz dedicated the most powerful spherical torus fusion facility in the world on Friday, May 20, 2016. The $94-million upgrade to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX-U), funded by the DOE Office of Science, is a spherical tokamak fusion device that explores the creation of high-performance plasmas at 100-million degree temperatures many times hotter than the core of the sun.

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