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The acronym for the study of science technology, engineering and mathematics, identified as essential in education.

Tracking the paths of the “Starlight Detectives” at Science on Saturday

When astronomer Isaac Roberts showed a photograph of the Andromeda Nebula to the Royal Astronomical Society, it caused a huge sensation. “There were audible gasps in the audience,” astronomer Alan Hirshfeld told the audience at the first Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory on Jan. 9.

“The professional astronomers had never seen such a clear image of the nebula,” Hirshfeld said.

PPPL physicists find clue to formation of magnetic fields around stars and galaxies

An enduring astronomical mystery is how stars and galaxies acquire their magnetic fields. Physicists Jonathan Squire and Amitava Bhattacharjee at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found a clue to the answer in the collective behavior of small magnetic disturbances. In a paper published in October in Physical Review Letters, the scientists report that small magnetic perturbations can combine to form large-scale magnetic fields just like those found throughout the universe. This research was funded by the DOE Office of Science.

PPPL physicists find clue to formation of magnetic fields around stars and galaxies

An enduring astronomical mystery is how stars and galaxies acquire their magnetic fields. Physicists Jonathan Squire and Amitava Bhattacharjee at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found a clue to the answer in the collective behavior of small magnetic disturbances. In a paper published in October in Physical Review Letters, the scientists report that small magnetic perturbations can combine to form large-scale magnetic fields just like those found throughout the universe. This research was funded by the DOE Office of Science.

New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Just as autumn heralds the arrival of students at Princeton University, it also means the beginning of a new season of science colloquia at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The talks by invited speakers on various science and engineering subjects take place throughout the school year; the 2015-2016 inaugural lecture will be given on Sept. 21 by Princeton University physics professor Suzanne Staggs, who will present "Probing the History and Dynamics of the Universe with Polarized Signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background."

New season of colloquia begins at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Just as autumn heralds the arrival of students at Princeton University, it also means the beginning of a new season of science colloquia at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The talks by invited speakers on various science and engineering subjects take place throughout the school year; the 2015-2016 inaugural lecture will be given on Sept. 21 by Princeton University physics professor Suzanne Staggs, who will present "Probing the History and Dynamics of the Universe with Polarized Signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background."

Summer interns present research findings in poster session

If you happened to be in the lobby of PPPL's Lyman Spitzer Building on Aug. 12, you would have seen the next generation of top scientists preparing to launch their careers. Twenty-five undergraduates from colleges across the country spent this summer at the Laboratory as interns, working on projects ranging from figuring out how to remotely steer a set of mirrors that will be built into the upcoming ITER fusion machine to studying how nanoparticles grow inside plasmas.

Summer interns present research findings in poster session

If you happened to be in the lobby of PPPL's Lyman Spitzer Building on Aug. 12, you would have seen the next generation of top scientists preparing to launch their careers. Twenty-five undergraduates from colleges across the country spent this summer at the Laboratory as interns, working on projects ranging from figuring out how to remotely steer a set of mirrors that will be built into the upcoming ITER fusion machine to studying how nanoparticles grow inside plasmas.

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