A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research

Stellarators

Subscribe to RSS - Stellarators

Figure-eight shaped tubes that confine hot plasma with external magnetic fields, developed by Lyman Spitzer in 1950 at the lab that became the PPPL.

Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and looks to future projects in “State of the Laboratory” address

The completion of the $94 million National Spherical Torus-Upgrade (NSTX-U) will usher in a decade of research that will lead to vital results for the international and national fusion programs and could lead the way to a next-step fusion facility, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Director Stewart Prager told staff members in his annual “State of the Laboratory” address on Oct. 5.

Laboratory Director Stewart Prager heralds start of new era with NSTX-U and looks to future projects in “State of the Laboratory” address

The completion of the $94 million National Spherical Torus-Upgrade (NSTX-U) will usher in a decade of research that will lead to vital results for the international and national fusion programs and could lead the way to a next-step fusion facility, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Director Stewart Prager told staff members in his annual “State of the Laboratory” address on Oct. 5.

COLLOQUIUM: W7-X Status Report

The world's most advanced stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, located in Greifswald, Germany, is rapidly approaching first plasma operation. Its purpose is to demonstrate the fusion reactor relevance of the optimized stellarator. The experiment is built for steady-state operation, featuring 70 superconducting coils, up to 10 MW of steady-state ECRH heating, and actively cooled plasma facing components.  The full operational magnetic field strength of 2.5 T has been reached, and the required topology - nested magnetic flux surfaces - has been verified.

COLLOQUIUM: Stellarator Research at PPPL and Beyond

Recent stellarator research activities have focused on international collaboration, primarily on W7-X. The activities include construction of the trim coil set on W7-X, design and construction of an X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, and design of a plasma component known as the "scraper element". The status of these research tools will be summarized and planning for the initial operational phase of W7-X, currently planned for July of this year, will be discussed. Planning is well underway for PPPL participation in the initial operational of W7-X.

Neilson visits German stellarator to pave way for U.S. researchers

Hutch Neilson, PPPL’s head of Advanced Projects, is saying “auf wiedersehen” to the Lab for the next nine months as he travels to Greifswald, Germany, where he will be paving the way for future U.S. researchers to participate on the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) program as the experiment begins preparing for operations next year.

David Gates, a principal research physicist and the stellarator physics leader at PPPL, will be serving as Interim Head of Advanced Projects in Neilson’s absence.

PPPL’s dynamic diagnostic duo

Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter are scientific pioneers who have collaborated seamlessly for more than 35 years. Together they have revolutionized a key instrument in the quest to harness fusion energy — a device called an X-ray crystal spectrometer that is used around the world to reveal strikingly detailed information about the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

Pages

U.S. Department of Energy
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

Website suggestions and feedback

Google+ · Pinterest · Instagram · Flipboard

PPPL is ISO-14001 certified

Princeton University Institutional Compliance Program

Privacy Policy

© 2017 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. All rights reserved.

Princeton University
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
P.O. Box 451
Princeton, NJ 08543-0451
GPS: 100 Stellarator Road
Princeton, NJ, 08540
(609) 243-2000