A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research

Science literacy

Subscribe to RSS - Science literacy

Having the knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes necessary to make informed decisions on scientific issues.

Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted

The announcement Feb. 11 of the detection of gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein some 100 years ago, created a surge of excitement among physicists worldwide, including many with ties to Princeton University. Early evidence for the waves was found several decades ago by Princeton astrophysicist Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse, a former physicist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. They received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1993.

Princeton physicists share in excitement of gravitational waves Einstein predicted

The announcement Feb. 11 of the detection of gravitational waves, predicted by Albert Einstein some 100 years ago, created a surge of excitement among physicists worldwide, including many with ties to Princeton University. Early evidence for the waves was found several decades ago by Princeton astrophysicist Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse, a former physicist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. They received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1993.

Von Hippel, at PPPL, calls for international control of nuclear enrichment

The world’s nuclear enrichment programs should be under international control to prevent the development of nuclear weapons after the new arms deal with Iran expires in 10 to 15 years, said Frank von Hippel, a senior Princeton University research physicist and a former security advisor during the Clinton Administration.

“We have 10 to 15 years to strengthen the non-proliferation machine,” von Hippel said, speaking at the Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday public lecture Jan. 30 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Tracking the paths of the “Starlight Detectives” at Science on Saturday

When astronomer Isaac Roberts showed a photograph of the Andromeda Nebula to the Royal Astronomical Society, it caused a huge sensation. “There were audible gasps in the audience,” astronomer Alan Hirshfeld told the audience at the first Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory on Jan. 9.

“The professional astronomers had never seen such a clear image of the nebula,” Hirshfeld said.

COLLOQUIUM: Chance, Necessity, and the Origins of Life

Earth's 4.5 billion year history is a complex tale of deterministic physical and chemical processes, as well as 'frozen accidents'. Most models of life's origins also invoke chance and necessity. Recent research adds two important insights to this discussion. First, chance versus necessity is an inherently false dichotomy--a range of probabilities exists for many natural events. Second, given the astonishing combinatorial chemical richness of early Earth, events that are extremely rare may, nevertheless, be deterministic on time scales of a billion years.

Pages

U.S. Department of Energy
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

Website suggestions and feedback

Google+ · Pinterest · Instagram

PPPL is ISO-14001 certified

Princeton University Institutional Compliance Program

© 2016 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. All rights reserved.

Princeton University
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
P.O. Box 451
Princeton, NJ 08543-0451
GPS: 100 Stellarator Road
Princeton, NJ, 08540
(609) 243-2000