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Power system design

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The design of the systems that would convert fusion energy into heat to create steam that would generate electricity.

COLLOQUIUM: Princeton University's District Energy Approach and Implications for Improving Energy Efficiency

We will discuss how heating, cooling, and electrical energy is currently produced and delivered to Princeton’s community of approximately 12,000 people and 180 buildings. What is the university’s carbon footprint, and what progress is being made to lower that? How are the university’s energy assets dispatched in real-time for best economic advantage while maintaining reliability and resilience? What changes is the university considering for improvement of its resource, cost, and emissions profiles?

PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine

The electric current that powers fusion experiments requires superb control. Without it, the magnetic coils the current drives cannot contain and shape the plasma that fuels experiments in doughnut-shaped tokamaks correctly.

PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine

The electric current that powers fusion experiments requires superb control. Without it, the magnetic coils the current drives cannot contain and shape the plasma that fuels experiments in doughnut-shaped tokamaks correctly.

Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL

As the most powerful spherical tokamak in the world, the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) produces magnetic forces that are far greater than what its predecessor could generate. Moreover, the power supply system that drives current in the fusion facility’s electromagnetic coils can potentially produce even higher forces unless properly constrained.

Developing the digital safeguard that protects the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade at PPPL

As the most powerful spherical tokamak in the world, the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) produces magnetic forces that are far greater than what its predecessor could generate. Moreover, the power supply system that drives current in the fusion facility’s electromagnetic coils can potentially produce even higher forces unless properly constrained.

COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint

I will give a brief overview of the technologies being pursued within GE, the largest conglomerate. I will then focus more on the electrical technologies for a more detailed description. These will include new devices such as SiC MOSFETs, electrical systems, controls, electrical machines, superconducting equipment, medical equipment, lighting, power conversion, materials, and energy storage. Work with PPPL on tubes will be discussed. 

Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade

Like a new passenger jet or power plant, the National Spherical Torus Upgrade (NSTX-U) must be certified safe to operate. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), the task of evaluating the safety of the $94 million upgrade belongs to the Activity Certification Committee (ACC), whose work remains ongoing. “This is a critical group,” said Adam Cohen, deputy director for operations at the Laboratory. “When you have a complex activity like the upgrade you need a standing committee to guarantee that it will run safely.”

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