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The study of plasma, a partially-ionized gas that is electrically conductive and able to be confined within a magnetic field, and how it releases energy.

Rajesh Maingi adds a new strategic dimension to fusion and plasma physics research

Physicist Rajesh Maingi remembers nearly everything. Results of experiments he did 20 years ago play back instantly in his mind, as do his credit card and bank account numbers.

His knack for recalling research results comes in particularly handy. “Knowing results from five-to-20 years ago makes it easier to ask the right questions for contemporary scientific programs,” Maingi said. Such findings have made him a leading expert on key aspects of the physics of plasma, the superhot, charged gas that fuels fusion reactions in donut-shaped magnetic facilities called tokamaks.

Scientists discuss progress toward magnetic fusion energy at 2013 AAAS annual meeting

Scientists participating in the worldwide effort to develop magnetic fusion energy for generating electricity gave progress reports to the 2013 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. Speaking were physicists George "Hutch" Neilson of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Richard Hawryluk, deputy director-general of the ITER Organization.  Following are summaries of their presentations.

Previewing the next steps on the path to a magnetic fusion power plant

By John Greenwald

Plasma meets nano at PPPL

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have launched a new effort to apply expertise in plasma to study and optimize the use of the hot, electrically charged gas as a tool for producing nanoparticles. This research aims to advance the understanding of plasma-based synthesis processes, and could lead to new methods for creating high-quality nanomaterials at relatively low cost.

18th Topical Conference High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics (HTPD)

The 18th Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics will be held May 16-20, 2010 in Wildwood, New Jersey. This biennial conference brings together plasma physicists from a variety of fields including magnetic confinement fusion, inertial confinement fusion, space plasmas, astrophysics, and industrial applications to discuss mutual problems in the development of instrumentation and experimental techniques for the characterization of high-temperature plasmas.

22nd International Conference on Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP)

The purpose of this conference series, which started at the College of William and Mary in 1967 "to disseminate progress in the state-of-the-art of plasma simulation and to report specific applications of computer experiments to various areas of plasma physics," remains unchanged. On the other hand, the topics of the Conference, which has been expanded over the years, now include:

19th Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas

Target audience

Fusion scientists and engineers, plasma physicists, RF engineers, theoretical physicists and specialists of plasma-wave interaction, students.

Topics of the conference

Wave interaction with plasmas, such as heating, current generation, diagnostics, and confinement and profile control.

RF applications in fusion devices, including tokamaks, stellarators, spherical tori, reverse field pinches, and other alternate confinement concepts.

Transport Task Force (TTF) 2011

The ultimate goal of the work of the Transport Task Force is a predictive understanding of plasma transport leading, in the end, to transport control. As we have pointed out previously, to achieve success in transport science, it is essential to characterize local fluctuations and transport in toroidal plasma, to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for transport, and ultimately, to control these transport processes.

PPPL physicists win supercomputing time to simulate key energy and astrophysical phenomena

Three teams led by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have won major blocks of time on two of the world’s most powerful supercomputers. Two of the projects seek to advance the development of nuclear fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy by improving understanding of the superhot, electrically charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

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U.S. Department of Energy
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

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