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The study of plasma, a partially-ionized gas that is electrically conductive and able to be confined within a magnetic field, and how it releases energy.

Top 10 PPPL stories that you shouldn’t miss

The past year saw many firsts in experimental and theoretical research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Here, in no particular order, are 10 of the Laboratory’s top findings in 2016, from the first results on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade to a new use for Einstein’s theory of special relativity to modeling the disk that feeds the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

1. First results of the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U)

COLLOQUIUM: Motivations for Spherical Torus research and initial results from NSTX Upgrade

The Spherical Torus/Tokamak (ST) is being explored as a possible means of accelerating the development of magnetic fusion energy.  The ST offers access to a higher ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure and extends toroidal confinement physics understanding including support for ITER burning plasma physics.  The ST may also provide an attractive configuration for fusion applications including plasma-material-interface solution development, fusion nuclear component testing, and a net-electricity producing Pilot Plant.  The NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) facility at PPPL supports all of t

PPPL’s Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series kicks off Jan. 14 with a banquet of cutting-edge science

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will once again offer a wide variety of cutting-edge science talks as it kicks off its popular Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series for high school students and science lovers of all ages on Saturday, Jan. 14, at 9:30 a.m. at the Laboratory, 100 Stellarator Road, Princeton, New Jersey.

A better way to simulate accretion of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way is developed by PPPL and Princeton scientists

cientists at Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have developed a rigorous new method for modeling the accretion disk that feeds the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The paper, published online in December in the journal Physical Review Letters, provides a much-needed foundation for simulation of the extraordinary processes involved. 

PPPL’s Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series kicks off Jan. 14 with a banquet of cutting-edge science

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will once again offer a wide variety of cutting-edge science talks as it kicks off its popular Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday Lecture Series for high school students and science lovers of all ages on Saturday, Jan. 14, at 9:30 a.m. at the Laboratory, 100 Stellarator Road, Princeton, New Jersey.

A better way to simulate accretion of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way is developed by PPPL and Princeton scientists

Scientists at Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have developed a rigorous new method for modeling the accretion disk that feeds the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The paper, published online in December in the journal Physical Review Letters, provides a much-needed foundation for simulation of the extraordinary processes involved. 

Scientists develop a path toward improved high-energy accelerators

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), in collaboration with researchers in South Korea and Germany, have developed a theoretical framework for improving the stability and intensity of particle accelerator beams. Scientists use the high-energy beams, which must be stable and intense to work effectively, to unlock the ultimate structure of matter.  Physicians use medical accelerators to produce beams that can zap cancer cells.

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