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The study of plasma, a partially-ionized gas that is electrically conductive and able to be confined within a magnetic field, and how it releases energy.

Steven Sabbagh leads study to predict and avoid disruptions on KSTAR plasmas

Steven Sabbagh, a senior research scientist at Columbia University on long-term assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named lead principal investigator for a multi-institutional project on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. The three-year, $3.3 million collaboration will study methods of predicting and avoiding disruptions on KSTAR, a long-pulse tokamak that produces plasmas that can last from 30 seconds to a design value of more than five minutes.

Steven Sabbagh leads study to predict and avoid disruptions on KSTAR plasmas

Steven Sabbagh, a senior research scientist at Columbia University on long-term assignment to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named lead principal investigator for a multi-institutional project on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) facility. The three-year, $3.3 million collaboration will study methods of predicting and avoiding disruptions on KSTAR, a long-pulse tokamak that produces plasmas that can last from 30 seconds to a design value of more than five minutes.

PPPL researchers successfully test new device that analyzes the surfaces of tokamak components within a vacuum

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have successfully tested a new device that will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between ultrahot plasma contained within fusion facilities and the materials inside those facilities. The measurement tool, known as the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), was built by a consortium that includes Princeton University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (U. of I.). 

PPPL researchers successfully test new device that analyzes the surfaces of tokamak components within a vacuum

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have successfully tested a new device that will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between ultrahot plasma contained within fusion facilities and the materials inside those facilities. The measurement tool, known as the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), was built by a consortium that includes Princeton University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (U. of I.).

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