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Plasma diagnostics

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The tools used by researchers to assess the characteristics of superheated and electrically charged gases known as plasmas.

PPPL’s dynamic diagnostic duo

Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter are scientific pioneers who have collaborated seamlessly for more than 35 years. Together they have revolutionized a key instrument in the quest to harness fusion energy — a device called an X-ray crystal spectrometer that is used around the world to reveal strikingly detailed information about the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

PPPL physicist Brian Grierson wins DOE Early Career Research Program grant

Physicist Brian Grierson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won a highly competitive Early Career Research Program award sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Science. The five-year grant will total some $2.5 million and fund exploration of the mechanisms that govern the formation and maintenance of the hot edge of fusion plasmas — the electrically charged gas that results in fusion reactions in facilities called tokamaks. The work will be carried out on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego.

Plasma Turbulence Simulations Reveal Promising Insight for Fusion Energy

With the potential to provide clean, safe, and abundant energy, nuclear fusion has been called the “holy grail” of energy production. But harnessing energy from fusion, the process that powers the sun, has proven to be an extremely difficult challenge.

Scientists have been working to accomplish efficient, self-sustaining fusion reactions for decades, and significant research and development efforts continue in several countries today.

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma in fusion experiments

A key issue for the development of fusion energy to generate electricity is the ability to confine the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in magnetic devices called tokamaks. This gas is subject to instabilities that cause it to leak from the magnetic fields and halt fusion reactions.

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma in fusion experiments

 A key issue for the development of fusion energy to generate electricity is the ability to confine the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in magnetic devices called tokamaks. This gas is subject to instabilities that cause it to leak from the magnetic fields and halt fusion reactions.

COLLOQUIUM: The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) will be discussed in the context of a more general program goal - to develop a compact realization of a tokamak fusion reactor. The general requirements for more compact tokamak reactors will be briefly discussed. The LTX project can investigate some, but not all, of these requirements, on a small scale. Recent results from LTX will be presented. Finally, the development of a toroidal system to test flowing liquid lithium walls, aimed at eventual implementation in a compact D-T tokamak, will be discussed.

Two PPPL physicists elected to receive prestigious honor

PPPL physicists David Gates and Charles Skinner have been named as American Physical Society fellows – a prestigious honor that is given to only one half of one percent of all APS members each year.

Gates, a principal research physicist and stellarator physics lead who has been at PPPL for 16 years, and Skinner, a principal research physicist at PPPL for 31 years whose work has focused on spectroscopy and plasma-wall interactions, will be honored at the APS Division of Plasma Physics meeting in Denver Nov. 11 to 15. The two bring the total number of APS fellows at PPPL to 51.

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Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

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