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Laser diagnostics

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The Multi-Point Thomson Scattering (MPTS) diagnostic system has been providing time dependent Te and ne profile measurements on NSTX for ten years.

COLLOQUIUM: In Silico Plasmas Under Extreme Intensities

Intense laser and particle beams can be focused down to intensities in excess of 10^23 W/cm^2. Similar intensities are also present in extreme astrophysical scenarios. Under these conditions, the interaction of these intense beams and fields with plasmas is very rich, permeated by collective processes, relativistic nonlinearities and strong field physics. The complexity of these scenarios can only be grasped resorting to large scale numerical simulations.  Advanced multi-scale models combined with massively parallel high performance computing are driving new discoveries.

Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade

Like a new passenger jet or power plant, the National Spherical Torus Upgrade (NSTX-U) must be certified safe to operate. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), the task of evaluating the safety of the $94 million upgrade belongs to the Activity Certification Committee (ACC), whose work remains ongoing. “This is a critical group,” said Adam Cohen, deputy director for operations at the Laboratory. “When you have a complex activity like the upgrade you need a standing committee to guarantee that it will run safely.”

COLLOQUIUM: In Pursuit of Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is conducting experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with the goal of igniting a propagating thermonuclear burn wave in DT fuel leading to energy gain (defined as fusion yield/input laser energy >1). To do this the NIF laser delivers up to ~ 2 MJ of energy to a hohlraum (cylindrical cavity) which generates x-rays that implode a ~2 mm diameter spherical capsule filled with a solid layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel.

Ahmed Diallo wins DOE Early Career Research Program funding

Physicist Ahmed Diallo of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won a highly competitive Early Career Research Program grant sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Science. His $500,000 per year award, which can be renewed for up to five years, will fund research into understandingand controlling the volatile edge of the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in devices called tokamaks. Controlling the edge of the plasma will be essential to harnessing fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity.  

Ahmed Diallo wins DOE Early Career Research Program funding

Physicist Ahmed Diallo of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won a highly competitive Early Career Research Program grant sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Science. His $500,000 per year award, which can be renewed for up to five years, will fund research into understandingand controlling the volatile edge of the superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in devices called tokamaks.

Phil Heitzenroeder named winner of the 2013 Fusion Technology Award

Phil Heitzenroeder, who leads the Mechanical Engineering Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and whose advice is sought by engineers around the world, has won the 2013 Fusion Technology Award.  The high honor from the Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) recognizes outstanding contributions to research and development in the field of fusion technology.

US ITER is a strong contributor in plan to enhance international sharing of prime ITER real estate

When the ITER experimental fusion reactor begins operation in the 2020s, over 40 diagnostic tools will provide essential data to researchers seeking to understand plasma behavior and optimize fusion performance. But before the ITER tokamak is built, researchers need to determine an efficient way of fitting all of these tools into a limited number of shielded ports that will protect the delicate diagnostic hardware and other parts of the machine from neutron flux and intense heat.

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