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Fusion reactor design

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The design of devices that use powerful magnetic fields to control plasma so fusion can take place. The most widely used magnetic confinement device is the tokamak, followed by the stellarator.

PPPL scientists unveil their latest results at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

More than 1,750 researchers from around the world, including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have gathered in Savannah, Georgia, this week for the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society’s Division of Plasma Physics. Researchers at the five-day conference, which ends Nov. 20, will attend nine half-day sessions featuring nearly 1,000 talks on subjects ranging from space and astrophysical plasmas to the challenges of producing magnetic fusion energy.

PPPL scientists unveil their latest results at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

More than 1,750 researchers from around the world, including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), have gathered in Savannah, Georgia, this week for the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society’s Division of Plasma Physics. Researchers at the five-day conference, which ends Nov. 20, will attend nine half-day sessions featuring nearly 1,000 talks on subjects ranging from space and astrophysical plasmas to the challenges of producing magnetic fusion energy.

COLLOQUIUM: The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor

Lockheed Martin Skunkworks is developing a compact fusion reactor concept, CFR. The novel magnetic cusp configuration would allow for stable plasmas in a geometry amenable to economical power plants and power sources. The details of the CFR configuration will be discussed along with a status of the current plasma confinement experiments underway at Lockheed. The presentation will also touch on the potential of a fast development path and challenges to bring such a device to fruition.

For a brief discussion of the project and images of the hardware:

Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have for the first time simulated the formation of structures called "plasmoids" during Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), a process that could simplify the design of fusion facilities known as tokamaks. The findings, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, involve the formation of plasmoids in the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have for the first time simulated the formation of structures called "plasmoids" during Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), a process that could simplify the design of fusion facilities known as tokamaks. The findings, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, involve the formation of plasmoids in the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

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