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Fusion reactor design

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The design of devices that use powerful magnetic fields to control plasma so fusion can take place. The most widely used magnetic confinement device is the tokamak, followed by the stellarator.

COLLOQUIUM: Smaller & Sooner: The ARC Pilot Design for Fusion Development

A new generation of superconducting (SC) tapes puts within reach loss-free magnetic fields with B > 20 Tesla on coil, doubling the field allowed by the present SC technology.  The tapes can also provide demountable SC toroidal field coils.  The ARC FNSF/Pilot design study explores how access to such technology would be a “game-changer” for small, robust tokamak reactors.

COLLOQUIUM: Large Scale Superconducting Magnets for Variety of Applications

Over the past several decades the U. S. magnetic confinement fusion program, working in collaboration with international partners, has developed superconductor and superconducting magnet technology to a very advanced level. These developments have been made using the low temperature superconductors (LTS) NbTi and Nb3Sn. The now operating Large Hadron Collider at CERN has demonstrated the scientific success of NbTi technology on a very large scale.

“Rip” Perkins, pioneering PPPL physicist and a design leader for ITER, dies at 80

Francis “Rip” William Perkins Jr., a pioneering plasma physicist whose contributions to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) ranged from seminal advances in fusion energy and astrophysical research to the education of a generation of scientists, died on July 26 in Boulder, Colo. He was 80 and had long battled Parkinson’s disease.

“Rip” Perkins, pioneering PPPL physicist and a design leader for ITER, dies at 80

Francis “Rip” William Perkins Jr., a pioneering plasma physicist whose contributions to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) ranged from seminal advances in fusion energy and astrophysical research to the education of a generation of scientists, died on July 26 in Boulder, Colo. He was 80 and had long battled Parkinson’s disease.

COLLOQUIUM: Superconductors for Fusion for Next Ten Years

Present fusion devices requiring superconductors all use Nb-Ti or Nb3Sn. But conductors for high magnetic field use are undergoing a considerable development at present, especially devices that may be made with the high temperature cuprate superconductors, REBa2Cu3Ox, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x and (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10. We at the magnet lab have used these conductors to generate magnetic fields over 35 Tesla in small insert coils and an all superconducting 32 Tesla magnet for users of the magnet lab is now in construction.

An Engineering Study for a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor

In 2013 Bob Woolley completed his Nuclear Engineering PhD at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, with a dissertation on a proposed conceptual design for a Fusion-Fission Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (FFHMSR). This talk will review the background, present the design concept, explain the analysis methods and findings, and discuss how the conceptual design might be pursued.

Campanell wins Lawrence Fellowship to pursue plasma physics research

Princeton University graduate student Michael Campanell has won a highly competitive Lawrence Fellowship, resulting in a postdoctoral position at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Campanell was one of just two candidates selected from a field of 163 applicants for the coming academic year for the fellowship, which is open to all technical disciplines.

“I was thrilled to receive this fellowship,” Campanell said. "I think it is the best possible fit for me."

Campanell wins Lawrence Fellowship to pursue plasma physics research

Princeton University graduate student Michael Campanell has won a highly competitive Lawrence Fellowship, resulting in a postdoctoral position at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Campanell was one of just two candidates selected from a field of 163 applicants for the coming academic year for the fellowship, which is open to all technical disciplines.

“I was thrilled to receive this fellowship,” Campanell said. "I think it is the best possible fit for me."

Plasma Turbulence Simulations Reveal Promising Insight for Fusion Energy

With the potential to provide clean, safe, and abundant energy, nuclear fusion has been called the “holy grail” of energy production. But harnessing energy from fusion, the process that powers the sun, has proven to be an extremely difficult challenge.

Scientists have been working to accomplish efficient, self-sustaining fusion reactions for decades, and significant research and development efforts continue in several countries today.

The Bleeding ‘Edge’ of Fusion Research

Few problems have vexed physicists like fusion, the process by which stars fuel themselves and by which researchers on Earth hope to create the energy source of the future.

By heating the hydrogen isotopes tritium and deuterium to more than five times the temperature of the Sun’s surface, scientists create a reaction that could eventually produce electricity. Turns out, however, that confining the engine of a star to a manmade vessel and using it to produce energy is tricky business.

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