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Fusion energy

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The energy released when two atomic nuclei fuse together. This process powers the sun and stars.  Read more

Stefan Gerhardt

Stefan Gerhardt leads the Advanced Scenarios and Control research group in the NSTX organization. He operates numerous diagnostics on NSTX, along with designing plasma control schemes and running physics experiments. He has previously worked on a wide variety of fusion machines, including spherical tokamaks, stellarators, and field reversed configurations.

Michael D Williams

Williams, the Engineer’s Engineer, sets standard for excellence

As an early career engineer at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Mike Williams found himself in the midst of a frantic race. He led a team charged with building crucial neutral beam heating systems for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the largest fusion facility in the world at the time. The deadline was impossibly tight.

Michael C Zarnstorff

Michael Zarnstorff is the deputy director of research for PPPL where he supervises research that ranges from testing ideas for harnessing fusion to developing rockets for space flight. His job encompasses keeping projects aligned with DOE goals and envisioning new research opportunities for PPPL. An award-winning physicist and a co-discoverer of the bootstrap current, he joined PPPL in 1984 and has been deputy director for research since 2009. He earned his PhD in plasma physics from the University of Wisconsin.

PPPL-designed coil critical to experiment arrives in stellar condition

Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have designed and delivered a crucial barn-door size component for a major device for developing fusion power. The component, called a “trim coil,” marks the initial installment of one of the largest hardware collaborations that PPPL has conducted with an international partner.

New Jersey firm creates jobs and vital components for world-leading experiment

One of the largest scientific projects since the moon landing has Oxford Superconducting Technology in Carteret, New Jersey, humming around the clock. The company is producing nearly 10,000 miles of superconducting wire for ITER, a huge international venture being built in the south of France to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion as a clean and abundant source of energy for generating electricity.

U.S. Department of Energy's Plasma Science Center holds third annual meeting at PPPL

More than 50 participants from a dozen U.S. research institutions gathered at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) May 17-18 for the third annual meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Plasma Science Center. The meeting featured papers on low-temperature plasmas, whose practical applications range from lighting to nanotechnology. Events at the session included a display of graduate student posters and a tour of PPPL.

Exascale Computing Allows Scientists to Approach New Class of Problems

Scientists at Princeton University are starting to compose the complex codes designed to instruct a new class of powerful computers that will allow researchers to tackle problems that were previously too difficult to solve. These supercomputers, operating at a speed called the “exascale,” will produce realistic simulations of dazzlingly complex phenomena in nature such as fusion reactions, earthquakes, and climate change.

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