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Fusion energy

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The energy released when two atomic nuclei fuse together. This process powers the sun and stars.  Read more

X marks the spot: Researchers confirm novel method for controlling plasma rotation to improve fusion performance

Rotation is key to the performance of salad spinners, toy tops, and centrifuges, but recent research suggests a way to harness rotation for the future of mankind's energy supply. In papers published in Physics of Plasmas in May and Physical Review Letters this month, Timothy Stoltzfus-Dueck, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), demonstrated a novel method that scientists can use to manipulate the intrinsic – or self-generated – rotation of hot, charged plasma gas within fusion facilities called tokamaks.

Delgado-Aparicio urges middle school students to pursue careers in science and join the quest for fusion energy

Physicist Luis Delgado-Aparicio told middle school students attending a conference of Hispanics Inspiring Students’ Performance and Achievement (HISPA) at Princeton University to follow their dreams and to pursue careers in science even if the path is difficult.

COLLOQUIUM: EXTERNAL PROPULSION AND THE FUTURE OF SPACE ACCESS

At Escape Dynamics we are working on the next generation propulsion technologies with the goal of developing electromagnetically-powered engines operating at 10x the efficiency of chemical rockets. In this talk I will describe results of Escape Dynamics’ R&D efforts and outline our vision for the future of aerospace transportation. The primary focus of the talk will be on the technical aspects of external propulsion in which all or a part of the energy required for launch is coming from a ground-based array of microwave antennas configured to beam microwave energy to the vehicle.

Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have for the first time simulated the formation of structures called "plasmoids" during Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), a process that could simplify the design of fusion facilities known as tokamaks. The findings, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, involve the formation of plasmoids in the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

Giant structures called plasmoids could simplify the design of future tokamaks

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have for the first time simulated the formation of structures called "plasmoids" during Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), a process that could simplify the design of fusion facilities known as tokamaks. The findings, reported in the journal Physical Review Letters, involve the formation of plasmoids in the hot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions.

Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

Three Princeton University-related computer programs have been chosen to run on a new supercomputer that will deliver enhanced scientific findings when it begins crunching numbers in 2018. The projects, consisting of a Princeton Department of Geosciences program and two studies involving the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), encompass high-performance computer codes to map the interior of the Earth and advance the scientific basis for developing fusion energy to generate electricity.

Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

Three Princeton University-related computer programs have been chosen to run on a new supercomputer that will deliver enhanced scientific findings when it begins crunching numbers in 2018. The projects, consisting of a Princeton Department of Geosciences program and two studies involving the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), encompass high-performance computer codes to map the interior of the Earth and advance the scientific basis for developing fusion energy to generate electricity.

COLLOQUIUM: Progress towards fusion on NIF and Z requires new plasma measurement capabilities

There is significant progress towards fusion on NIF and Z with alpha particle heating on NIF and modest neutron yields on Z. However future progress requires advances in measurement capabilities. Examples of high speed xray imaging, optical Thomson scattering, neutron imaging, time resolved neutron spectroscopy, time resolved x-ray spectroscopy, and gamma spectroscopy will be described.

 

A little drop will do it: Tiny grains of lithium can dramatically improve the performance of fusion plasmas

Scientists from General Atomics and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a phenomenon that helps them to improve fusion plasmas, a finding that may quicken the development of fusion energy. Together with a team of researchers from across the United States, the scientists found that when they injected tiny grains of lithium into a plasma undergoing a particular kind of turbulence then, under the right conditions, the temperature and pressure rose dramatically.

A little drop will do it: Tiny grains of lithium can dramatically improve the performance of fusion plasmas

Scientists from General Atomics and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a phenomenon that helps them to improve fusion plasmas, a finding that may quicken the development of fusion energy. Together with a team of researchers from across the United States, the scientists found that when they injected tiny grains of lithium into a plasma undergoing a particular kind of turbulence then, under the right conditions, the temperature and pressure rose dramatically.

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