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Fusion energy

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The energy released when two atomic nuclei fuse together. This process powers the sun and stars.  Read more

Stewart Prager

Stewart Prager was the sixth director of PPPL. He joined the Laboratory in 2009 after a long career at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. At Wisconsin, he led research on the “Madison Symmetric Torus” (MST) experiment and headed a center that studied plasmas in both the laboratory and the cosmos. He also co-discovered the “bootstrap current” there—a key finding that has influenced the design of today’s tokamaks. He earned his PhD in plasma physics from Columbia University.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists confirm the precision of magnetic fields in the most advanced stellarator in the world

Physicist Sam Lazerson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with German scientists to confirm that the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) fusion energy device called a stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, produces high-quality magnetic fields that are consistent with their complex design.

PPPL and Max Planck physicists confirm the precision of magnetic fields in the most advanced stellarator in the world

Physicist Sam Lazerson of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has teamed with German scientists to confirm that the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) fusion energy device called a stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, produces high-quality magnetic fields that are consistent with their complex design.

PPPL senior physicist Wei-li Lee honored at week-long symposium

Physicists from around the world gathered at the University of California, Irvine this past summer for a symposium in honor of Wei-li Lee, a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The week-long event, held from July 18-22, focused on gyrokinetic simulation — a technique Lee invented in the 1980s to model the behavior of particles within plasma, the ultrahot gas composed of electrons and atomic nuclei that fuels fusion reactions.

PPPL senior physicist Wei-li Lee honored at week-long symposium

Physicists from around the world gathered at the University of California, Irvine this past summer for a symposium in honor of Wei-li Lee, a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The week-long event, held from July 18-22, focused on gyrokinetic simulation — a technique Lee invented in the 1980s to model the behavior of particles within plasma, the ultrahot gas composed of electrons and atomic nuclei that fuels fusion reactions.

PPPL Physicist Richard Hawryluk to chair the Nuclear Fusion editorial board

Richard Hawryluk, a distinguished physicist who heads the ITER and Tokamaks department at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), has been named chair of the board of editors of Nuclear Fusion, the leading monthly journal in the field of controlled fusion energy. Announcement of the appointment came during the 2016 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Fusion Energy Conference in Kyoto, Japan.

PPPL physicists build diagnostic that measures plasma velocity in real time

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have developed a diagnostic that provides crucial real-time information about the ultrahot plasma swirling within doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. This device monitors four locations in a plasma, enabling the diagnostic to make rapid calculations of how the velocity profiles of ions inside the plasma evolves over time.

PPPL physicists build diagnostic that measures plasma velocity in real time

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have developed a diagnostic that provides crucial real-time information about the ultrahot plasma swirling within doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. This device monitors four locations in a plasma, enabling the diagnostic to make rapid calculations of how the velocity profiles of ions inside the plasma evolves over time.

PPPL scientists present key results at the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics

More than 100 scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Laboratory (PPPL) joined nearly 2,000 others from around the world in San Jose, California, to discuss the latest findings in plasma science and fusion research. PPPL physicists contributed to papers, talks and presentations ranging from astrophysical plasmas to magnetic fusion energy during the 58th annual meeting of the American Physical Society (APS) Division of Plasma Physics.

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