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Engineering

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This function manages the design, fabrication and operation of PPPL experimental devices, and oversees the Laboratory’s facilities and its electrical and infrastructure systems.

Plasma meets nano at PPPL

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have launched a new effort to apply expertise in plasma to study and optimize the use of the hot, electrically charged gas as a tool for producing nanoparticles. This research aims to advance the understanding of plasma-based synthesis processes, and could lead to new methods for creating high-quality nanomaterials at relatively low cost.

Super Separator

Superior separation of nuclear waste: This advanced centrifuge under development at PPPL can deliver faster, more efficient and more economical separation of nuclear waste than standard centrifuges permit.

Praise and suggestions for fusion research from a utility industry think tank

Research to develop fusion energy has shown “significant progress” in many areas, according to a new report from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), a think tank whose members represent some 90 percent of the electricity produced in the United States. At the same time, the report said that a commercial fusion power plant is at least 30 years away, and called for more research on the engineering challenges.

Adam Cohen

Adam Cohen is the deputy director of operations for PPPL, overseeing functions ranging from engineering and project management to finance and communications. He joined the Laboratory in 2009 after enjoying a rich and varied career that included being in the nuclear submarine service in the U.S. Navy, working as chief operations officer at Argonne National Laboratory, and serving as senior science adviser at the U.S. Department of Energy. He earned his PhD in materials science from Northwestern University.

Michael D Williams

Williams, the Engineer’s Engineer, sets standard for excellence

As an early career engineer at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Mike Williams found himself in the midst of a frantic race. He led a team charged with building crucial neutral beam heating systems for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), the largest fusion facility in the world at the time. The deadline was impossibly tight.

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U.S. Department of Energy
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory managed by Princeton University.

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